How To Write Effective Blog Posts

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An article was written last September (2012), that I read today on uxmag.com, called Five User Experience Lessons from Tom Cruise.  The article really gained my attention.  The article used characters that Tom Cruise had played as examples of five user experience lessons and included great images that represented specific scenes in each movie.

The marriage of recognizable imagery and stories from each film and knowledge about the subject matter, user experience, made the article connect with me in ways that I would not have otherwise.  The visual cues and story-telling made the articles much more interesting – so much so I bookmarked the other four articles I could find in the series (Jim Carrey in April 2013, Johnny Depp in October 2012, Laura Dern in February 2013, and Tom Hanks in November 2012).   It has been proven that photos increase visibility, which is why I work to find great imagery for each of my blog posts, and why I also have started to share the photo on Facebook with a link in the description of the photo, instead of directly posting a link type post to Facebook.  Not only does Facebook favor visual media in its EdgeRank algorithm, but the reason Facebook prefers it is because people prefer to look at something visual rather than textual.

My current strategy with my blog is just to write.  I am most concerned with executing, regardless of everything else.  I am making the point to post at least once a day.  It doesn’t matter what it is – I am just practicing writing.  The problem has always been that I’ve found excuses not to just do it.  While that is true, I am still attempting to use good strategy like including great visual representation of my point, posting images to Facebook instead of links, and linking to relevant content within the posts themselves.  I am also of the school of thought that brevity is king.  Short.  Simple.  Easy to grab the concept and be affected by it without any arduous reading of a hugely long post.

The end.  (I couldn’t figure out how to end this one.)

By Tanner